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DaveWalton
07-01-2005, 02:07 PM
Hi,

Here is the scene description - "a free spirit in great turmoil comes to terms with the consequences of her actions".

I did something for this scene earlier but was asked to do an "alternate" piece. That probably translates into a polite version of "we didn't much like what you sent in the first place." Second chances are good, though.

Here is the second thing I did. I'm not much on the very intro before the tablas come in (it sounds disjointed to me) so any comments or suggestions about that part or any part for that matter would be welcome.

Uses Gold, Silver, Stormdrum, Stylus RMX, and Pure Tablas. I need RA!

Thanks in advance for listening.

Dave

www.DaveWaltonMusic.com/MyMusic/MomentOfSadness.mp3

Beach
07-01-2005, 02:15 PM
Dave,
you have created great atmosphere here, with this piece.
I really enjoy it!!!
If you could get Ra you will be add a very india-theme!!!! ;)
Keep up the great work,
Roberto

jralbert
07-05-2005, 08:40 PM
Hey Dave,
I heard your first piece on this project, and now I'm listening through your second; this lastest piece is stronger than the first.

That said - and I am very new to the professional side of film scoring, so take my advice with a grain of salt - if my producer came to me with just one sentence for a cue, especially something as vague as "a free spirit in great turmoil comes to terms with the consequences of her actions", he'd get the "huhwha?" look. Who's the free spirit? Why's she in turmoil? What did she do that she's now facing up to? I mean, are we talking murder or minor misdeeds here? Do you have access to the script to clarify this stuff? To me, writing for picture is almost an exercise in acting; empathy for the characters and the situation guide the themes and the orchestration.

In more specific, hopefully more helpful terms, I'd turf the silver choir; the short attacks just make it really hard to work with when it's up front in the mix. Generally I drown it in reverb and use it as a pad, but that's not really what you're after with that notation, I don't think; what about using a stronger instrument like a solo flute or violin - or even a harmonium - to expressively carry the line?

-Jeff

DaveWalton
07-06-2005, 11:17 AM
Hey Dave,
I heard your first piece on this project, and now I'm listening through your second; this lastest piece is stronger than the first.

That said - and I am very new to the professional side of film scoring, so take my advice with a grain of salt - if my producer came to me with just one sentence for a cue, especially something as vague as "a free spirit in great turmoil comes to terms with the consequences of her actions", he'd get the "huhwha?" look. Who's the free spirit? Why's she in turmoil? What did she do that she's now facing up to? I mean, are we talking murder or minor misdeeds here? Do you have access to the script to clarify this stuff? To me, writing for picture is almost an exercise in acting; empathy for the characters and the situation guide the themes and the orchestration.

In more specific, hopefully more helpful terms, I'd turf the silver choir; the short attacks just make it really hard to work with when it's up front in the mix. Generally I drown it in reverb and use it as a pad, but that's not really what you're after with that notation, I don't think; what about using a stronger instrument like a solo flute or violin - or even a harmonium - to expressively carry the line?

-Jeff

Thanks for listening! (to both) :-)

The description I gave was the "cliff notes" version, just to give the basic flavor of what I was after. I agree that it needs something stronger, an Indian wind instrument of some sort. I've heard some stuff from RA that others have done and I've heard the instrument I'm thinking of in those pieces but I don't know off the top of my head what it is.

Dave