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ninetytwowheels
10-26-2007, 01:35 AM
That's the number of tonewheel generators in a Hammond B/C3 or so I've been told. I've read other figures since I made it my 'net nickname.

Greetings to the many very talented musicians that populate this forum. I hope to learn from reading your posts primarily and soak in the rest of what I need to know by osmosis.
As many of the posters here seem to be into film music, I will mention that my favorite soundtrack composer is Maurice Jarre.

Currently, I am in the process of putting together a hobby/project studio and Symphonic Orchestra is my choice for trad orchestral sounds. I'm also using a number of other libraries so that if I feel like doing a jazz fusion arrangement, I can do so.

I have been in love with the sounds that instruments make since I was very young, but due to a number of personal shortcomings passing as "good reasons", I have never mastered any one instrument. But I do have rudimentary keyboard skills, can read and strangely enough have discovered I have a knack for arranging. Sonar makes it easy enough to make music that is pleasing to my ears, and that others seem to enjoy as well. My arrangement of "Linus and Lucy" is a huge hit with the toddlers who've heard it.

All musical styles and genres appeal to me, ancient and modern.

My most profound musical experience came on a trip to rural Scotland. I had heard about 'singing wires', telephone wire on poles strung between glass insulators carrying the usual phone traffic between rural farmsteads. I had also read that they could function as massive Aeolian Harps, playing fundamentals, harmonics, subharmonics etc. Thought it would be cool to hear it, but didn't make any plans as you have to be in the right place at the right time and I didn't have a clue on how to do that.

I was driving along a section of coastine by the ocean, when I thought I heard an orchestra tuning up. I checked to see if the radio was on, and realized that the 'music' I was hearing was coming from the phone wires! I stopped the car and just sat on the ground with my back against a telephone pole, entranced....The wind is a magificent composer, and can't even write a single note.

I'd love to hear from musicians who've had experiences similar and from those who can suggest musical inspirations as yet beyond my imagination.

Very Cordially,

92Wheels

Nash
10-27-2007, 06:33 AM
Hello 92Wheels,

Welcome to wonderful forum here where you will find many talented and skilled composers just like you said previously.
You will definitely learn something here and I am sure that we will learn something from you as well. Good move by joining us.

Interesting background and funny nickname I must say.:D


Enjoy!

Cheers!

Nash

MrAlex
10-27-2007, 06:51 AM
Hey 92wheels, interesting experience. I was working on a friends farm once, putting up wire fences. Part of the job involves tensioning the wire once it's threaded, and it gets pretty tight (a couple of tons of tension probably). Anyway, you can pluck the wires like a guitar string, and tension the different wires at different levels to make different notes. Loads of fun although it wasn't condusive to getting the job finished. When you pluck it the sound itself travels along the wire, some of these fences are about a kilometer long and you can hear it ping up and down the wire, like some weird kind of sci-fi phaser delay effect.

I thought I was the only nutcase out there, nice to see I'm not alone :)

Welcome to the site :)

ninetytwowheels
10-27-2007, 10:14 AM
Nash, MrAlex:

I do appreciate the welcome to the SoL community.

Somehow it doesn't suprise me that the first replies to my post came from Oz. Prior to my retirement, I spent the last 5 years of my career working as an engineering liason between Telstra and a large US data network. Never got to visit, but I made many good friends and won't lack for company if I ever do get down under.

MrAlex, cool story regarding wire tensioning. Did you sample the phaser effect? Perhaps you can offer it up as a plug-in! :)

MrAlex said : "I thought I was the only nutcase out there, nice to see I'm not alone".

I'm not so sure that playing with wires or appreciating their tonal qualities qualifies as madness! What is appealing to me about music is the nature, quality and emotional impact that each individual sound makes on my nervous system. It doesn't matter whether that sound is produced by a master violinist playing a Stradivarius or the tensioning of fencing wire.

I guess that's why M. Jarre is my favorite film composer. Sophisticated as he is, he always seems to manage to find a representative sound seemingly indigenous to the environment or setting of the film and work it into the score.

Enough blather for now.

Most Cordially,

92Wheels

Andoran
10-27-2007, 02:01 PM
Hello 92Wheels and welcome

I spent part of my growing up in rural Nevada. In the central part of the state, near Fallon, there is a dune, fairly large and all by itself amidst the scrub desert sagebrush. It's made up of sand (silicone) of a unique crystalline structure, and has been studied for years. It's known as the "Singing Dune" and if the wind is blowing it makes one of the most ethereal, moving sounds I've ever heard.

Look forward to hearing your work

Eddie

ninetytwowheels
10-27-2007, 08:26 PM
I spent part of my growing up in rural Nevada. In the central part of the state, near Fallon, there is a dune, fairly large and all by itself amidst the scrub desert sagebrush. It's made up of sand (silicone) of a unique crystalline structure, and has been studied for years. It's known as the "Singing Dune" and if the wind is blowing it makes one of the most ethereal, moving sounds I've ever heard.


Fascinating information. I'm going to google it after I finish my reply to you. Hopefully, someone has posted an audio file of the Dune singing in a high wind!:)

I hope to receive more posts from musicians with knowledge of these "bleeding edge" natural and man-made 'found' musical phenomena.

Happy to meet you, Andoran. I am truly appreciative of your reply.

Most Cordially,

92Wheels

Andoran
10-27-2007, 11:42 PM
Here's a link for The Singing Dune (Sand Mountain) http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tips/getAttraction.php?Tip_AttractionNo==924. It seems there are other singing dunes all over the world, but only 3 locations in the US. Here's another link with sound/video recordings of some of the sounds the sand can make http://www.lps.ens.fr/~douady/SongofDunesIndex.html

ninetytwowheels
10-28-2007, 10:32 AM
Andoran:

Appreciate the pointers. Found some of my own as well. I didn't realize how much scholarly research has been conducted on this phenomena.

Guess all of these odd musical things really fall into the category of 'ambient sound'.

I read an interview once where Jimi Hendrix said that he was inspired to reproduce the sounds that he heard while parachute jumping on the guitar. What he heard while free falling through the atmosphere affected him profoundly, and became the basis of his early style which led to his huge success.

Speaking of ambient, anyone here enjoy Brian Eno's work? I love his work on Paul Simon's last album "Suprise". By normal standards, he produced the album. However, Eno is not credited as producer but as provider of "sonic landscape".

Cordially,

92 Wheels