PDA

View Full Version : Building computer for first time


andrewjs
04-13-2008, 11:30 AM
Hey folks,

I'm thinking about jumping into the do-it-yourself computer-building club. I've never done it before, so I'm wondering if anyone knows of a solid guide on the subject. I could probably figure a fair amount of it out, but certain things like the gluing of this to that when it's expensive electronics freaks me out a bit. How much glue, what kind of glue? Etc.

I'm going to stick to "basics" and go with an XP32 system since that is what my current hardware and software support, and I want to keep things "simple" and maybe upgrade in a couple years for a 2-machine setup with a 64-bit system when the edges get sorted out a bit in the 64-bit world.

Any advice appreciated.

-Andrew

andrewjs
04-15-2008, 11:40 AM
Hey folks,

I'm thinking about jumping into the do-it-yourself computer-building club. I've never done it before, so I'm wondering if anyone knows of a solid guide on the subject. I could probably figure a fair amount of it out, but certain things like the gluing of this to that when it's expensive electronics freaks me out a bit. How much glue, what kind of glue? Etc.

I'm going to stick to "basics" and go with an XP32 system since that is what my current hardware and software support, and I want to keep things "simple" and maybe upgrade in a couple years for a 2-machine setup with a 64-bit system when the edges get sorted out a bit in the 64-bit world.

Any advice appreciated.

-Andrew


Thanks for the many responses. Now I feel good about getting my feet wet.

j/k maybe it's better i avoid doing this.. i actually just learned about the Mac Pro 8 so I might go that route anyway. but thought it would be fun to build a cheap XP system on my own to tide me over.

Vatroslav
04-15-2008, 01:53 PM
Hey, Andrew,

The reason I think why you haven't gotten any responses is because your concerns have been addressed here many, many times on this forum before, including the x64 performance report thread two topics up where I hope you will be able to find lots of info regarding building a new system, along with the proof that there are no x64 edges to sort out. ;)

Let me know if you need more help.

andrewjs
04-15-2008, 02:56 PM
Hey, Andrew,

The reason I think why you haven't gotten any responses is because your concerns have been addressed here many, many times on this forum before, including the x64 performance report thread two topics up where I hope you will be able to find lots of info regarding building a new system, along with the proof that there are no x64 edges to sort out. ;)

Let me know if you need more help.

thanks, i'll poke around. I had done a preliminary search, but I guess not for the right words and phrases to yield much of anything too useful.

A.Leung
04-15-2008, 03:30 PM
kind of difficult to find a step by step guide online I would think since everyones needs are unique. Maybe the best choice, if your planning on mostly running East West stuff is to choose a platform them mimic someones setup here, assuming of course that their system is up/running and stable.

andrewjs
04-16-2008, 08:19 AM
i guess what i need less than a list of good components is some guide or instruction on the process of "gluing" stuff together, or do the components come with these kinds of instructions? i understand that a lot of building a computer is like legos, but some things scare me off a tad, and if i can figure that stuff out or have a reliable how-to, that would be ideal.

Vatroslav
04-16-2008, 04:05 PM
"Gluing" the parts is not like legos. ;)

You shouldn't be doing this on your own if you have no experience, every store should offer the assemblying service.

A.Leung
04-16-2008, 04:06 PM
"Gluing" the parts is not like legos. ;)

You shouldn't be doing this on your own if you have no experience, every store should offer the assemblying service.

< ---what he said.

andrewjs
04-16-2008, 04:26 PM
"Gluing" the parts is not like legos. ;)

You shouldn't be doing this on your own if you have no experience, every store should offer the assemblying service.

i was referring to the t. grease and separately to the rest of the process of putting cards in slots, etc. the "lego" analogy was used by a guy i know who builds lots of computers, he said it was like legos.

anyway, i beg to differ.. how does one gain experience if one doesn't just jump in and do it from scratch?

Jesse Searls
04-16-2008, 06:26 PM
Actually I taught myself how to Lego all that RAM and giggerbits together. Go to Barnes or Borders and buy a PCs for Dummies, and google it, there's gotta be 15 ka'billion guides on various sites...hardocp.com, anadtech.com, tomshardware, boxgods.com, there are a bunch of sites to go to, which may or may not have beginners guides. www.Newegg.com has a bunch of reviews which are mostly reasonable and is a great place to buy everything.

Yeah dive in, it's not an overnight thing, like composing or biking, or even....chopsticks?

-jess

paulwr
04-16-2008, 06:27 PM
i was referring to the t. grease and separately to the rest of the process of putting cards in slots, etc. the "lego" analogy was used by a guy i know who builds lots of computers, he said it was like legos.

anyway, i beg to differ.. how does one gain experience if one doesn't just jump in and do it from scratch?

I recently did my first one and it went fine. Here's a resource for some quiet fans and cpu coolers: endpcnoise.com

My mobo is a GA-P35-DS4 rev 2.1 and worked great. Be sure to be meticulous in choosing RAM that matches up with your board. The scariest part is sticking on a cpu 3rd party cooler. You'll usually want to do that before placing the mobo. Just research well, take your time on the first one, then you'll feel competent and want to assemble some slave computers.

I like rackmount so all my slaves and main computer are in one vertical rolling rack. You'll want a lot are room for air circulation on your main DAW because you'll most likely have a lot of hard drives in it. I have five in that one alone. Plus you'll be working it hard in general.

Exercise some care, be informed, it will go well!

-Paul

Enlighten
04-16-2008, 08:49 PM
Hey Andrew,

Building your own computer can definitely save you a lot of money while giving you a stable and high-performance computer if you get good components for it. I did it once back then when I wanted to build a computer for gaming while on a budget, lol. Anyhow, you need to first do your research on the compatibilities of the components and all that. And also figure out what brands to buy, etc. Buy a GOOD PSU (Power Supply). You should research on the wattage you need based on the components of your computer. I made the mistake of getting a bad PSU back then and it froze my computer at times. And buy good RAMs. Crucial is a good brand.

As far as "gluing" stuff, the only thing that you really need to "glue" is the thermal paste before installing your CPU. Here's a guide on how to do it:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/how-to-build-a-pc-part-3,1382-3.html

And here's the complete guide for assembling your computer:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/how-to-build-a-pc-part-3,1382.html

Of course, your components would vary, but the concepts should remain the same. Tomshardware is a great resource for researching before building your own computer. Be sure to check out their current PSU reviews for a stable system.

Good luck and it's actually quite fun when you put everything together and it works! :D

A.Leung
04-16-2008, 10:00 PM
Good luck and it's actually quite fun when you put everything together and it works! :D

;)

kstevege
04-17-2008, 09:47 AM
may I suggest...

Sonica Labs

Ulfrinn
04-17-2008, 06:23 PM
I taught myself how to build computers as well. The way I learned was taking apart a computer i didn't use anymore, so I understood just the basics on putting hardware in slots, and installing the motherboard. Then I decided to go for it and built myself a decent gaming computer. Had a bit of trouble shooting (as is the case in most self builds), but it was successful. I now have built many computers for friends, family, etc.

Its really fairly easy, and the manual that comes with the motherboard should have a very detailed guide on all the connections, all you need to know are the acronyms (http://www.computer-juice.com/forums/f10/acronyms-4474/).

This forum (http://www.computer-juice.com/forums/f10/building-pc-computer-part-one-2454/) was very helpful too. That link brings you to the thread about learning to build a computer, but I'd recommend perusing other parts of the forum too. It covers hardware, troubleshooting, and pretty much everything else about computers you could possibly imagine.

Good Luck!

Ulfrinn

andrewjs
04-17-2008, 07:54 PM
thanks for the encouragement. it is a tug of war to build and learn and save money vs. get one already made, windows or mac. i think it is worth the money to learn even if it doesn't go so well first time.

Ulfrinn
04-18-2008, 08:52 AM
If you want a PC and wanna save money, i'd say go for it. Its nearly half the price, it gives you a whole new background of knowledge, and is extremely satisfying when you do pull it off (not to mention the higher performance, because you have complete control of what software and OS components you install). Plus - its pretty hard to screw up. Everything usually can only go in one way, so as long as you don't force anything, you shouldn't have any trouble. And if you do, there are tons of great troubleshooting resources online, including the forum I linked above.

Good luck, no matter what ya decide

Ulfrinn

w1awb
04-22-2008, 03:34 AM
I built my first one last weekend and it took a surprisingly short time. I bought a barebones kit from TigerDirect that had the processor and motherboard I wanted and added the extra drives and graphics card. The CPU cooler IS the scariest part but it can click right in if you know what you're doing. (I didn't and managed to screw up one of the pins) It's not that hard. Don't forget to designate the drive with the operating system the C drive. makes things easier down the road.
Andy

Ulfrinn
04-22-2008, 04:40 PM
Only thing I'd add, which isn't mentioned in the guide I recommended above, is do NOT force the CPU into its socket AT ALL. Set it on top of the socket, and if it's facing the right way it will fall into place perfectly. If it doesn't, do NOT push it. Lightly pick it up, and try again until it falls into place. (there is usually a little triangle on one corner of both the CPU and MOBO, to show you which way it should face. Then you just line up the pins with the holes and drop it in)

I only mention it because pushing it at all involves a great risk of bending or breaking the pins, and unless you have the tools to repair tiny pins, even one broken or severely bent pin renders the CPU unusable.

As for CPU cooler...yes it is the scariest part. You will need to use a bit of force for this, but if you find yourself using a ton of force and its not helping much, chances are you're doing it wrong. Good news is its pretty hard to break. Just follow the diagram that came with it and it should be fine.

The rest of the build is pretty easy and straightforward. Just need to know acronyms to know what the heck the MOBO manual is talking about. (That was my problem with my first build)

alkie
04-24-2008, 06:31 AM
don`t be afraid of putting it together yourself that way you know exactly what`s in there rather than stuff you don`t need . i put mine together in 3 hrs . it`s very hard to screw up when every attachment can only fit in one place and it`s fun when you finish, turn it on and it works there a bigger sense of satisfaction in that other than buying a pre assembled. have fun mate . alan k.