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View Full Version : Is 2 harddrives "ok" for now


billmaudio
08-14-2008, 09:14 PM
So I am updating my system, added more ram, got a core 2 duo processor, and I want to get some SATA drives. With the size of drives being so big, I was wondering if I could get away with just using 1 drive for OS and the 2nd drive for sounds and audio. I run protools, so the 2nd drive would be used for mixing as well. I only own colossus which uses up 32gb. Would I be ok for now with using this setup, OR is is mandatory to have a HDD dedicated just for sounds.

Thanks guys!

persentio
08-14-2008, 10:47 PM
It is definitely recommended you get 3 HDDs: 1 for OS, 1 for your audio (Protools projects), and 1 for Colossus.

Spinning poo machine
08-16-2008, 01:46 PM
What...? So does the DAW go on the same drive as the OS or not? What's the "audio drive" supposed to be for? Saved files or the DAW?

johng
08-16-2008, 02:21 PM
all the programs go on the boot (main) drive, along with the OS. So that includes the DAW software, the OS, ProTools if you have it, and the programs themselves. On the second drive go the libraries only (the libraries for Colossus or Strings or Brass or whatever -- the main programs for Colossus or Strings or Brass go on the main drive). The third drive is the "recording" drive, to which your DAW or ProTools software writes audio tracks.

all that said, if you have only two drives, you can still make music. You won't be able to run dozens of simultaneous audio tracks and midi all at once, but you'll still be able to run a fair amount.

nobody can specify exactly what you will be able to do with a given setup because it always depends on the complexity of your midi and sample tracks, the number of audio plug-ins, and so on.

Good luck!

Spinning poo machine
08-17-2008, 07:19 AM
So the audio drive is just where you save projects? I just don't understand this concept of putting the DAW on one drive while recording tracks on another drive unless by "recording" you mean saving the tracks to that drive.

Daryl
08-17-2008, 08:11 AM
So the audio drive is just where you save projects? I just don't understand this concept of putting the DAW on one drive while recording tracks on another drive unless by "recording" you mean saving the tracks to that drive.
When you play audio files, they stream from the hard drive (unless you use some cr*p cheapo sequencers on the market). Therefore, you don't want your audio on the system drive, or the sample drive.

D

Javee
08-17-2008, 10:47 AM
I run 3 drives, 1 for OS and DAW, 2 for sample libraries. I have SO and SD on one, Choirs on the other. No specific drive for saving audio files - not that it matter, because i don't need to bounce. With this setup, i have never reached a limit other than the 32 bit ram limitations. Beyond that amount, i could not tell you how much of what you would need. But if you are running a 32 bit system, i don't think it really all matters that much. Just my 2 cents.

-Mitch

Spinning poo machine
08-17-2008, 12:18 PM
When you play audio files, they stream from the hard drive (unless you use some cr*p cheapo sequencers on the market). Therefore, you don't want your audio on the system drive, or the sample drive.

I'm not familiar at all with this concept, is there a page or tutorial on it anywhere?

johng
08-17-2008, 01:17 PM
I'm not familiar at all with this concept, is there a page or tutorial on it anywhere?

It's in Digital Performer or Logic or Cubase or whatever you are using to sequence. Just change the target disk drive for record / playback to a disk other than the boot drive. It's easy.

Spinning poo machine
08-17-2008, 03:59 PM
Ohhh... That makes sense. Thanks.

I don't have my system yet (ordered it Thursday), but I'll be sure to do that. But does it really make that much of a difference?

Leecosmos
09-16-2008, 12:14 PM
It's in Digital Performer or Logic or Cubase or whatever you are using to sequence. Just change the target disk drive for record / playback to a disk other than the boot drive. It's easy.


Hi could you help with this? Do you recommend using a dedicated audio drive if you have 1 main drive and two audio/sample drives - 320gb each. but i have at least 130gb of samples.

So my question is should i divide these samples between the two drives or put them all on one and have the other for audio as above mentioned in your quote?

Thanks for any help

johng
09-17-2008, 01:08 PM
Do you recommend using a dedicated audio drive if you have 1 main drive and two audio/sample drives - 320gb each. but i have at least 130gb of samples.

So my question is should i divide these samples between the two drives or put them all on one and have the other for audio as above mentioned in your quote?

Most people recommend that you keep 20% of the drive empty. Putting all your samples on a single drive will still allow that with room to spare, so that's no problem.

If it were me, I'd put all the samples on one drive and use a separate drive for a record drive. That's what I did initially, though I now have four drives; one boot, one record, and two for samples and movie playback.

A.Leung
09-17-2008, 02:04 PM
Most people recommend that you keep 20% of the drive empty.

I would try and aim for 40%. The increase in speed is quite noticably measurable.

Spinning poo machine
09-17-2008, 02:59 PM
I would try and aim for 40%. The increase in speed is quite noticably measurable.

What if you have a buttload of libraries (9) at about 160 GB in total but installed them all on one 500GB drive? Is that a good idea or is it better to distribute them across a few hard drives? I've heard so many contradictory opinions regarding this I'm not sure what to believe anymore. Some say just keep 20-40% free on your hard drive(s); while others say that you need to spread the libraries around on different hard drives. Who's right?

A.Leung
09-17-2008, 03:35 PM
Much better to distribute across various drives. It helps in preventing bottelnecks from samples that are used simultaneously.

Hmm- I learned something today. A buttload = 9. :)

lappinit
09-18-2008, 01:21 AM
Much better to distribute across various drives. It helps in preventing bottelnecks from samples that are used simultaneously.

Hmm- I learned something today. A buttload = 9. :)

I have just bought a second internal hard disk for samples, my first having gotten full rather quickly after installing platinum plus!:o

I have SD2 and MOR on order, I was wondering if it is better to keep all play libraries on the same hard disk (which would necessitate some library juggling) or whether i can put my new play purchases straight on the new hard disk separate from Platinum plus?

Leecosmos
09-18-2008, 01:22 AM
Most people recommend that you keep 20% of the drive empty. Putting all your samples on a single drive will still allow that with room to spare, so that's no problem.

If it were me, I'd put all the samples on one drive and use a separate drive for a record drive. That's what I did initially, though I now have four drives; one boot, one record, and two for samples and movie playback.


OK Cool,

but what i need to get my head around is this :

Is the record drive just for playback of your sequencer eg. cubase and if using this method does this drive need to be empty or would your program drive not do for this? ( a 3-in-1er);)

A.Leung
09-18-2008, 01:41 AM
I have SD2 and MOR on order, I was wondering if it is better to keep all play libraries on the same hard disk (which would necessitate some library juggling) or whether i can put my new play purchases straight on the new hard disk separate from Platinum plus?

Keep heavily used simultaneous libraries on separate drives. In other words say your doing a huge orchestral piece with lots of choirs doubling your orchestral parts. With Platinum as your main orchestral work horse and EWQLSC (choirs) as your choir/voices it wouldnt make sense having those on the same drive since both orchestra and choir are getting quite the workout SIMULTANEOUSLY.

A.Leung
09-18-2008, 01:43 AM
OK Cool,

but what i need to get my head around is this :

Is the record drive just for playback of your sequencer eg. cubase and if using this method does this drive need to be empty or would your program drive not do for this? ( a 3-in-1er);)

Try to AVOID recording on your program drive.

Leecosmos
09-18-2008, 06:54 AM
Try to AVOID recording on your program drive.

Thanks - noted,


I just really want to know if ye recommend in my situation with 2 audio drives

1) whether to divide the samples between them and still use one of those as your recording drive or

2) use one totally for samples and keep the other completely empty for recording.

i really appreciate all the help ye all have been giving me by the way

cheers

A.Leung
09-18-2008, 11:14 AM
I don't see it making any massive difference in scenario 1 vs scenario 2. With the prices of hard drives being where they are now, I'd spring for more drives but if your really stuck on two drives go with scenario 1.

Spinning poo machine
09-18-2008, 01:42 PM
Much better to distribute across various drives. It helps in preventing bottelnecks from samples that are used simultaneously.

Hmm- I learned something today. A buttload = 9. :)

Aw, man... That's what I figured. Thanks. But now I just have no idea how to distribute everything. It's ok to use more than one library on a hard drive at the same time, isn't it? As long as it isn't something freakishly complicated (like Gold/Platinum + Choirs simultaneously on one drive)?

A.Leung
09-18-2008, 01:51 PM
It's ok to use more than one library on a hard drive at the same time, isn't it? As long as it isn't something freakishly complicated (like Gold/Platinum + Choirs simultaneously on one drive)?

Of course. Thats fine. We have buttloads x 5 libraries on single drives running-no problem. Choirs and Symphony orchestras should have separate drives.

Spinning poo machine
09-18-2008, 02:27 PM
Cool.