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View Full Version : What kind of cymbals do you prefer?


Mister Nice Guy
04-09-2009, 03:27 PM
Hello guys,

you maybe noticed that EWQLSO includes 3 different "crash" cymbals. ;)

- French Cymbal
- German Cymbal
- Viennese Cymbal

I read in the book "Professional Orchestration" by Peter Lawrence Alexander that the preferred
orchestral size for symphonic ensembles range from 15" to 18" in diameter and that turkish cymbals
have been preferred for their vibrating qualities.

So, what cymbals do you prefer which are include in EWQLSO?

And why aren't there any turkish cymbals? :D

All the best!

Tino

Jeff Hayat
04-09-2009, 03:50 PM
Shiny ones!

paulwr
04-09-2009, 03:57 PM
I opt for metal every time..............

-Paul

Mister Nice Guy
04-09-2009, 04:13 PM
Some serious answers? :confused: ;)

Lemmonz
04-09-2009, 04:38 PM
Aren't Zildjian cymbals Turkish?

A.Leung
04-09-2009, 04:58 PM
I think it depends on what your doing?

Pietro
04-09-2009, 05:09 PM
I prefer different cymbals ;). And that's a serious answer.

- Piotr

Mister Nice Guy
04-09-2009, 05:32 PM
Aren't Zildjian cymbals Turkish?

I don't know. Are they?

I think it depends on what your doing?

I just wanna create a typical orchester setup in my project and I'm just looking for
today's most used cymbals in a standard orchestra.

mhuang
04-09-2009, 05:52 PM
I don't know. Are they?



I just wanna create a typical orchester setup in my project and I'm just looking for
today's most used cymbals in a standard orchestra.

just load the "all cymbal" patch so you don't miss anything.

Pietro
04-09-2009, 06:15 PM
I just wanna create a typical orchester setup in my project and I'm just looking for today's most used cymbals in a standard orchestra.

In my experience as a percussionist, most popular are 20" Viennese "a due" cymbals (which are missing in EWQLSO) and 18" suspended cymbals.

- Piotr

johncarter
04-09-2009, 06:20 PM
I like the french cymbal, there more punchy than the other

obmit
04-10-2009, 04:40 AM
The nationalities refer to the thickness of the cymbal. Can't remember exactly, but pretty sure French is thinest and German thickest.

Obmit

Nick Batzdorf
04-10-2009, 12:57 PM
You have the advantage of being able to try all three to hear which one has the tone that supports the orchestral crash you're reinforcing the best.

This isn't something you can read about in an orchestration book!

paulwr
04-11-2009, 08:55 AM
I always have all of the cymbals loaded and just use whatever sounds best, which is the guiding rule for midi mockups if you are simply going for the best sound. I don't have any favorites. Even if I did have favorites, it doesn't mean I'd use them the most.

-Paul

KenK
04-11-2009, 09:47 AM
I'm pretty sure Zildjian's are Turkish (at least originally)
In the "belly dancing" world, finger cymbals are most often called "zils"- short for Zildjian.

Ken

playz123
04-11-2009, 11:03 AM
Armenian!?

"Avedis Zildjian I (the first) was an Armenian alchemist in the city of Constantinople in the seventeenth century. His attempts to create gold by combining base metals led instead to an alloy of copper, tin and traces of silver with unique sound qualities. Avedis used this discovery to create cymbals of spectacular clarity and power. The sound of the instruments was extraordinary, and as his reputation grew he was given the name “Zildjian”, an Armenian word meaning “son of cymbal maker.”

The Zildjian secret alloy is now nearly four centuries old. It has been passed down between Zildjian heirs for fourteen generations. Currently, Armand Zildjian’s two daughters, Craigie and Debbie are continuing the family tradition. Zildjian has been officially recognized as the oldest continually family-owned business in America."

Kev Curtis
04-11-2009, 11:29 AM
Let your ears be the judge. If it sounds right, then use it.