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peter5992
04-09-2009, 08:33 PM
Good evening everyone:

I watched Nick Phoenix' instructional videos afternoon - something puzzled me (and it has puzzled me before, when using the NI based symphonic choirs):

In the Time Editor, there is an "Off" part after the vowels. I assume that related to a midi message note on / note off. However, if you look carefully, there is a final consonant immediately following the "Off" marking.

I hope you can follow me - if you want a specific example, look at video no. 1, at 2:33. This is where Nick demonstrates the choirs singing "Silence is Golden". Note that in "Golden", in the second syllable ('den'), the 'n' follows the "Off" marking.

Now, I am a midi simpleton, but if the n follows an off marking, how come we can hear it at all? I thought the whole idea of midi notes on/off was to make a virtual instrument shut up after the note off midi command? What is going on here?

If someone can shed some light on this, I'd be really appreciative. I really loved the videos by the way - very interesting and enlightning. Gives me a much better perspective on what has changed in the Play version.

Thanks,
Peter

A.Leung
04-09-2009, 09:00 PM
note OFF is when you release a key from your keyboard. what happens AFTER the note off is not necssarily silence. What you hear depends upon what comes after. For example you might include a slow fade out after a note release.

silence is golden? I keep hearing 'soggy' or something there! And whats up with the Quick times. Even on my friends mac lappy its like super cinema scope or something... I'm going to have to download all of these using Q.T. Pro and somehow reduce the aspect ratio...

rav4
04-09-2009, 10:32 PM
The QT files are large (151mb and up), so I downloaded the MP4s. Their resolution is fine. Play fine with QT player on my mac mini with 1920x1200 monitor. The MP4s are 1800x700. Can resize to any size you want though. If you can't see or get to the bottom-right resizer (not sure what to call it) with mouse, you can select menu: View>Half Size (or command-0 [zero]) to see whole window and resize from there.

peter5992
04-10-2009, 06:37 AM
note OFF is when you release a key from your keyboard. what happens AFTER the note off is not necssarily silence. What you hear depends upon what comes after. For example you might include a slow fade out after a note release.



That is true, but here's the point: how can you even hear the last consonant (n) if the note off command precedes it?

ps the Quicktime format is viewable if you set it to 'full screen' - that way it crops both screens on whatever screen you use. I watched the movies on my 15" laptop yesterday, the fine print gets a little fuzzy but it's still ok. The wide angle is triggered by the WB and SC screens side by side.

LFO
04-10-2009, 07:46 AM
Hello Peter,
Anything (syllable or consonant) that is drawn after the off line will sound when the note is released. Think of lifting up on the key as being the same as pushing down on it. It allows you to control the shape of a word when you want the same note to play for the entire word.

Sometimes the final consonant is not easily audible when lifting the key. I generally find this to be because the note length is too short. If you lengthen the note it will become more audible. I would experiment by lengthening a note by a 100 ms or so just to hear what is happening.

This is a very useful feature because it allows you to shape the note and the timing of the note very nicely. For instance, lets say you have the word `amen'. You want the `a' to stretch out in order to match the instruments. When you type in the word in WordBuilder, I am going to guess that Wordbuilder is going to put the a to the left of the off line and men to the right of the off line. What this means is that the a will hold as long as you press and hold a note. As soon as you lift up on the note the `men' will play. Hence, you can get the timing of when `men' should play very easily. You can then edit the note lengths, etc. of `men' to fit with the instruments.

Words can get choppy when you do this, so experiment with cross fades to smooth transitions out.

Hope this helps,

-Kevin

peter5992
04-10-2009, 11:29 AM
Thanks Kevin - that's very helpful - now I finally get it.