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View Full Version : Creation of the "Ex Vita Morte" demo for EastWest's "The Dark Side"


admin
02-11-2011, 09:27 AM
http://www.soundsonline.com/static/images/ew198-title.png


We are often asked how some of the official EASTWEST demos are created. So what we have here is an in-depth look at the creation of the "Ex Vita Morte" demo for THE DARK SIDE virtual instrument. The "Ex Vita Morte" demo was produced by Doug Rogers and Zennor Alexander.

The video tutorial is in 3 parts that shows how the track was built up with LOGIC and PLAY, including some creative uses of the PLAY interface controls and features.

The idea with these products is to use the interface controls and features to expand the possibilities of the included instruments to create an end result that is truly unique.

We suggest you download the Quicktime version, it's better quality than the YouTube version, but always remember Quicktime videos are compressed so you should download the .wav audio version of "Ex Vita Morte" under the audio demos tab to listen to audio quality. In the real world there would be an additional "mastering" stage, but this provides a good example of the production of the track that only used instruments and effects that come with the collection, there is no additional processing.

And for those that aren't aware of the concept of THE DARK SIDE, please read the product description, it is intentionally distorted/mangled and designed for alternative rock, but it's also extremely useful to add tough and bizarre sounds to film, tv, and games soundtracks (and is being used on a major game production right now). In addition to the purposely distorted/mangled instruments though there is a large selection of instruments that are just bizarre, dark, and/or eerie.

http://www.soundsonline.com/The-Dark-Side - go to Video Tutorials.

Koumoulas
02-11-2011, 10:56 AM
Thanks!

Sid Francis
02-11-2011, 11:58 AM
Dear Mr. Admin...:rainbow-note:

I achieved to listen to the audio demo without collapsing for about 40 seconds without greater harm or injuries, I think thats about average :D
Serious: I would have LOVED videos about the making of the RA-Demosongs or those played with SILK, because I myself am not always so creative to use those strange instruments in the right way and would be more than pleased to see, how, what and when the composers did in the demos.
Why the heck now videos about the only (!) library I didnīt even look at before...;)

questions over questions...

or what about the overdue video concerning "how to build good sounding string arrangements in EWQL Orchestra" ? (without beeing a composer or beeing able to read or write notation) :)

desktop_arranger_
02-11-2011, 01:12 PM
fantastic, thanks, I really appreciate !

desktop_arranger_
02-11-2011, 03:22 PM
(without beeing a composer or beeing able to read or write notation) :)

frankly I think that's asking too much....building a string arrangement is a job for composers and reading music is necessary.....thinking that you can do away with it ,only makes composing a very difficult (I'd say impossible) process, or a process where you are relying on good ideas appearing out of nowhere, rather than relying on skills and your ear.

Reading music is also necessary to understand and analyze scores by other composers, something that anyone intending to call himself a composer, would have to do anyways.

Just my opinion...

desktop_arranger_
02-11-2011, 03:56 PM
I have really enjoyed it and learned, please keep them coming

Jeff Hayat
02-11-2011, 05:54 PM
Ok, who is that speaking? :eek:

Sid Francis
02-12-2011, 12:50 AM
Hello desktop arranger..
You probably got me a bit wrong: what I wrote about is not general composing skills: I got these already without reading notation. What I meant is just how to get the best result out of those dozens of playing techniques in EWQL Gold Orchestra together with the absolute minimal editing possibilities of the actual play engine. I have a lot of difficulties with this library that I do not have with Vienna or Philharmonik or any other sample library. I am longing to see someone working with the presets, to see, what articulation he uses in which situation and what is the result. When I personally do it it always turns out to sound "wrong" somehow: because the crescendo is too fast/too slow, the general attack of the sample is (mostly) too fast/too slow..etc I know that you can get excellent results with it when listening to the demos, but I rarely get out of it what I thought I would/could. I just need some visual advice/examples. I hope that explains my situation a bit better. And PLEASE donīt tell me that I just need more practise: I already know that i just should spend some more months/years with the library and then would probably be wiser. I just want to accelerate that process a bit.. :p

desktop_arranger_
02-12-2011, 04:52 AM
Hello desktop arranger..
You probably got me a bit wrong: what I wrote about is not general composing skills: I got these already without reading notation. What I meant is just how to get the best result out of those dozens of playing techniques in EWQL Gold Orchestra together with the absolute minimal editing possibilities of the actual play engine. I have a lot of difficulties with this library that I do not have with Vienna or Philharmonik or any other sample library. I am longing to see someone working with the presets, to see, what articulation he uses in which situation and what is the result. When I personally do it it always turns out to sound "wrong" somehow: because the crescendo is too fast/too slow, the general attack of the sample is (mostly) too fast/too slow..etc I know that you can get excellent results with it when listening to the demos, but I rarely get out of it what I thought I would/could. I just need some visual advice/examples. I hope that explains my situation a bit better. And PLEASE donīt tell me that I just need more practise: I already know that i just should spend some more months/years with the library and then would probably be wiser. I just want to accelerate that process a bit.. :p

You need more practice....

:p Just kidding.

whatever works for you.

Yeah I agree with your about the SO library....I too want to see videos of how to put it to best use. Like you, I am not getting out all I can from it, although with a bit of patience I recorded some good music....and actually I was impressed.

There's some good tutorials on the manual but will have to go through it again. Videos would be far better.....I'd even buy them. Why not Eastwest making very high quality training videos to sell to customers....

Sid Francis
02-12-2011, 05:22 AM
That is a very good idea and I would also pay for them!
For recording purposes I am using Samplitude 11 Pro. To call its (pdf)manual sub par would still be a nice compliment for a programm with such sophisticated functions. So, a very kind user, Kraznet, has privately produced some tutorial videos about different aspects of SAM. The reaction: the crowd is cheering! All users
love his work and watch the videos over and over because thereīs always SOMEthing you didīnt notice before and that will help you in your workflow. So he just started to produce them professionally.
I am working in a very big german music store and every day several copies of "Hands on Cubase" run through my fingers, though its manual isnīt that bad. Visual education is more entertaining and keeps your attention compared to reading page after page in a pdf.
The same with the libraries: to watch someone using the same presets like you but probably having quite different results will widen your viewing point of what is or might be possible with the given sounds. I remark this again and again when i see other people, mostly on youtube, working with the same tools like me, but doing (and getting) totally different things. Its amazing. I am already very glad about the things I found out with the EWQL Orch. but I only scratched the surface.

Chicken
02-13-2011, 04:18 AM
thanks for the creation video !

it would have been interesting to see the Sequencer Screen too.

+1 for the EWQL Tutorial Videos, i'd pay for them too.

afaik it's only a few months until TDS is eligible for Discounts, can't wait :)

Benedict Nichols
02-13-2011, 06:10 AM
Thanks :)

Doug Rogers
02-14-2011, 10:04 AM
it would have been interesting to see the Sequencer Screen too.

That's not very practical, it would make the interface too small, we described what was being done in the sequencer where it was relevant, but 99% of this was done in PLAY.

Cheers,

- D

TheRaider
02-14-2011, 07:46 PM
Just curious how did you record this?

I wanted to add a few tutorials to my youtube channel but I can't figure how to record talking audio and the output of my DAW.

desktop_arranger_
02-16-2011, 02:48 PM
but I only scratched the surface.

I totally agree on all you said. I don't hesitate to say that when I choose software, I choose the one with the best documentation. In other words, the faster I can learn how to use it, the more I am willing to pay. Time is very valuable to me and even though I am financially poor, time to me is MORE valuable than money.

I also have a deep ingrained bad experience with Cubase. I remember years ago when I was trying to diligently study the manuals, and I found them REALLY bad. For this reason, I have a really bad aversion to Cubase, even though I use it.

I use it because I could find an LE used version for 15 bucks. That's how much I am willing to pay for it. I will never spend 600 dollars for that software. I would rather buy sample libraries or software that gives me instant gratification, and that means a software that has a nice documentation of some kind, being paper or video. Video is always preferable, of course, but I also studied some independent videos about software like Sonar, and didn't get much out of them even after 4 hours of video.

For me, feeling the progress of learning how to use efficiently how to really use the libraries I buy, is of primary importance.

The real problem is that some videos about how to use Cubase etc, are not recorded by COMPOSERS, which is what I want to see and what I would buy. To me a composer showing you how to use a software or a sample library, beats any other videos, bar none. The composer simply thinks more directly. He will use whatever works best and ignore the features he has no real use for.

Let's face it, software is not the easiest thing in the world to learn about..... I am not dumb when it comes to computers but I really love soft

Don't know if I am conveying what I want to say. I really say 'thanks' to EW for showing us these videos and hope they will make many more of them and put them for sale. Learning is always an investment even though I have to pay for it, which I'd willingly do :)

Phantom
04-11-2011, 02:09 PM
I really enjoyed this demonstration

But it would have been nice to see a full step-by-step approach as to how the MIDI work was progressing also. It gives us a better idea on the way EWQL work on their projects. I always wanted to see the MIDI work. Obviously, for most of us, we do not need an introduction to working with MIDI, but it is the actual progress and ways of recording that would have been good to see.

Still, this was a nice tutorial explanation.

Thanks