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madstarr12
08-09-2012, 01:40 PM
I had a topic on this, but it was in the General thread, and well, it'll probably fit well here.

Anyway, just as the title suggests, a library of Baroque era Orchestral Instruments. Though some may not know, baroque instruments do have differences in sound when compared to modern instruments. A library like this to an extent of Symphonic Orchestra (with all sections) will be fantastic. Have solo instruments, as well as ensemble instruments (Violin section, Cello Section, Trumpet section, Horn Section, etc), and even relatives to the orchestral instruments like Viola da Gamba (all forms: Bass, Tenor, Alto, Violone, etc), Viola d'amore, Oboe da caccia, Serpent, etc. since they were in some cases used in orchestral situations at the time. It might be difficult to track down people who own instruments like these, but there are several baroque orchestras worldwide who still perform in that manner.

Dick the Flick
08-10-2012, 08:14 AM
+ 1

and lutes, harsichord, hautbois etc ...... anything early European medieval or any folk instruments.

I predict an imminent boredom threshold with symphonic sounding scores for commissioners of movie scores, video games and all known manner of media. (i've composed and produced many myself ..... with and without orchestras)

Kids working on laptops in bedrooms are producing amazing sounding scores on minor BBC documentaries in the UK for free (ie to "get themselves a name in the business, they compose and produce music for no fee") ... but sadly they are all starting to sound the same.

Cheap budget docs with very low production value have been the first to be oversubscribed by epic symphonic music ..... so the equation is fast becoming:-

EPIC SYMPHONIC SOUNDING = CHEAP SOUNDING

I have a good high ranking friend in the BBC Music dept in London who has recently expressed a worry that directors no longer ere towards "real" symphony scores on drama productions because they now find it difficult to tell the difference between the sample library stuff and sessions with musicians! WHAT A SIGN OF THE TIMES.

Amazing sounding epic scores are apparently becoming very unfashionable amongst those great doyens of taste and cool ..... directors. :(

We've shot ourselves in the foot.

However what sample libraries like East West have done with their sophisticated development of technology is enable their R & D depts to open the door for sampling many other genres of instrument ..... MORE LIKE THAT PRETTY PLEASE!

Annabelle
08-18-2012, 09:26 AM
And how about the fortepiano, the early version of our modern piano?

RozenHeim
08-18-2012, 10:26 AM
+100!!!!!!

We NEED this so bad!!!! If EW decides to produce such a library, get the Harpsichord right. It should be crisp; not too dark, and not too bright. If at all possible, sample the one used by the English Chamber Orchestra... Come to think of it, I would sample two harpsichord (some works call for two, and it also gives some versatility to the library as a whole).

Stringtheorist
09-13-2012, 02:26 AM
+1000!

Annabelle
09-14-2012, 10:13 PM
Just out of curiosity, what in this world is a hautbois?

pkm
09-15-2012, 12:36 AM
It's an oboe.

Annabelle
09-15-2012, 06:59 AM
It's an oboe.
So it's like a prehistoric version of an oboe?

pkm
09-15-2012, 09:53 AM
Hautbois is still the French word for oboe. While the baroque version isn't the same one the dinosaurs were playing, it was popular in the baroque period (1600s to mid 1700s).

karlfeuerstake
09-16-2012, 11:32 AM
I think it'd be pretty cool to have a pack of instruments like this. Not everyone gets an opportunity to hear high-quality recordings of these aged instruments. However, perhaps not everyone would be interested in this; in terms of marketing value, most composers might not need a program like that. Perhaps it would be better offered as an upgrade for Symphonic Orchestra, or owners of any Hollywood instrument pack.

Altauria
11-12-2012, 11:48 AM
This type of library is first on my 'want' list. As long as it's comprehensive and not half-a$$ed.

I can't agree more with Dick the Flick. The 'epic (what an over/misused word!) orchestra' has run its course. At least to anyone with taste. I don't mean the execution of large, widely scoped orchestral music, but rather the way it's produced and sounds.

Also mentioning documentaries is spot on. While I'd rather not rely on sample libraries to concede to budget cutting film production companies, thus further adding to the devaluing and misunderstanding of music in general, specialist musicians are very hard to come by. Documentaries lend themselves greatly to these instruments, as they're far more reflective in nature.

Dick the Flick
11-12-2012, 12:33 PM
Absolutely B.P. ...... agree agree and thrice agree! DtF x

Annabelle
11-14-2012, 09:41 PM
How about these? The crumhorn, gemshorn, and dulcian?

Jonathan120
11-15-2012, 12:58 AM
@Altauria You're very condescending and negative. Why so bitter? ;D You don't need to slag other things off to make a point, -that- just devalues your actual point :-)

The library idea is interesting, but personally I'd rate it pretty far down the list of instrument sounds I enjoy hearing.

Dick the Flick
11-15-2012, 04:06 AM
@Altauria You're very condescending and negative. Why so bitter? ;D You don't need to slag other things off to make a point, -that- just devalues your actual point :-)

The library idea is interesting, but personally I'd rate it pretty far down the list of instrument sounds I enjoy hearing.


I'm sorry Jonathan but I don't really understand your reaction to Altauria? I didn't read this as "condescending and negative ". (perhaps the "anyone with taste" comment was a over egging things a little ... but I don't think Brian was being seriously bitter .... perhaps a little over enthusiastic?! )

I simply read it as observation. Which part of the note did you feel "just devalued the actual point?"

jspencer
11-15-2012, 08:49 AM
+ 1

and lutes, harsichord, hautbois etc ...... anything early European medieval or any folk instruments.

I predict an imminent boredom threshold with symphonic sounding scores for commissioners of movie scores, video games and all known manner of media. (i've composed and produced many myself ..... with and without orchestras)

Kids working on laptops in bedrooms are producing amazing sounding scores on minor BBC documentaries in the UK for free (ie to "get themselves a name in the business, they compose and produce music for no fee") ... but sadly they are all starting to sound the same.

Cheap budget docs with very low production value have been the first to be oversubscribed by epic symphonic music ..... so the equation is fast becoming:-

EPIC SYMPHONIC SOUNDING = CHEAP SOUNDING

I have a good high ranking friend in the BBC Music dept in London who has recently expressed a worry that directors no longer ere towards "real" symphony scores on drama productions because they now find it difficult to tell the difference between the sample library stuff and sessions with musicians! WHAT A SIGN OF THE TIMES.

Amazing sounding epic scores are apparently becoming very unfashionable amongst those great doyens of taste and cool ..... directors. :(

We've shot ourselves in the foot.

However what sample libraries like East West have done with their sophisticated development of technology is enable their R & D depts to open the door for sampling many other genres of instrument ..... MORE LIKE THAT PRETTY PLEASE!

Maybe in England, but here in North America I have found the exact opposite. For the directors I have worked with, they WANT the big, epic orchestral sounds. There's nothing worse than a documentary with synthy MIDI "orchestral" tracks.

Dick the Flick
11-15-2012, 09:10 AM
I absolutely agree. There IS nothing worse than a doc with synthy MIDI "orchestra" ... I think what I'm probably suggesting (rather ineptly) is that due to there having been so much time and money invested in recreating the feel and quality of a large (epic) orchestra, perhaps with something as incredible as Hollywood Strings and Brass being on the market (for a few hundred pounds) the holy grail is in any professional musicians grasp, and indeed its resulting wide spread proliferation, means we have to be careful that over use of this easily accessible (high quality) sound, doesn't oversaturate the market and become last week's news due to it being everyone's "go to" solution.