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lgrohn
05-25-2005, 11:33 PM
You will find here about 10 new pieces from 2-3 last weeks:

http://www.synestesia.com/

All pieces were generated in 5 seconds from the pictures shown. The orchestration
using Gold or Colossus took a little longer.

lil-man
05-26-2005, 06:30 AM
I dig this! I love technology! Where can I find a program like this?

lgrohn
05-26-2005, 10:53 AM
I dig this! I love technology! Where can I find a program like this?
The Java applet (500-600 lines) generating those midi files is running only on my Mac and PC. Perhaps in near future some VCs will get interested...

Clockworker
05-26-2005, 02:25 PM
Um.. i didn't really understand.. what is this program?

lgrohn
05-26-2005, 02:34 PM
Ah. Software that generates music (midi file) from any picture (photo)
in a few seconds.

Clockworker
05-26-2005, 02:50 PM
ooook... This is the worst thing i've heard in my life!
Music is human!

I mean, if you can't compose (in generaly i'm speaking) so don't compose!
This kind of program gonna kill music...

But i'll say nothing more, because i'm really angry!

Edit: And it's not your problem, or mine...

neoTypic
05-27-2005, 12:23 AM
ooook... This is the worst thing i've heard in my life!
Music is human!

I mean, if you can't compose (in generaly i'm speaking) so don't compose!
This kind of program gonna kill music...

But i'll say nothing more, because i'm really angry!

Edit: And it's not your problem, or mine...

Ok, now I'm not lgrohn's biggest fan as he comes across rather brusque and oppugnant at times, but it's clear he has at least has a basic comprehension of composition if he can make an applet to do such things.

Now, I much rather lgrohn compose something "organically" as I don't find algorithmically contrived music appealing, but it still is a pallate and tool like any other we use. I highly doubt this method will replace all forms of music any more than loop based construction will.

Take a step back and consider the music on its own merits. If you did not know the method of creation would you like it? Dislike it? Why?

Mills2k
05-27-2005, 01:34 AM
Yes, I agree that it is only a technique. I'd be more interested to know if Igrohn harvests any of the nice tidbits he creates from this to use in a planned composition.

And in response to the question about whether I'd like it or not if I didn't know how it were composed: I'd say it was rather random, but had some nice moments. Reminded me a lot of a lot of modern atonal music in that regard: it seems like there's something there, but I just can't get to it.

My older brother did something similar... he took the DNA coding sequence for a protein in the inner ear membrane or something, and assigned each of the 4 letters a different note, and equal values, and messed around with it from there. In terms of data sources, pictures is just one way to do it. Pictures are nice though because they contain so much data in a visual medium that you can look at, and possibly try to associate the music with.

Looking at the pictures with the music, you almost think, "Was it made for this picture?" Well, yes and no, is the answer, I think. The instrumentation seems like it was chosen to better suit the picture. But the code itself has no sense of what's in the picture other than colors and such. It doesn't know what the picture is showing, so it's not really "composing" a song for that scene, just for a set of data. But still, the pieces all seem to fit nicely... That also has a lot to do with the picture choice in the first place. Certain pictures just would not yield satisfactorally relevent results.

Cool stuff, altogether though.

ChrisE
05-27-2005, 06:43 AM
This is a tough one to talk about. My housemate and I have had several heated debates about John Cage's 4'33, and Schoenberg's 12 tone pieces, and similar music. For me music has to consist of at least melody, harmony, or rhythm. With out these things I find it falls flat on its face. But that's not to say there is no merit in it. If I were to say Cage and Schoenberg did nothing for the evolution of music then I would wrong, and with this synthesized music from computer software it would be wrong to dismiss it offhand.

I liked the middle mp3 from the American flag picture :D

Could you explain how the program works? Does the software calculate tempo as well?

An interesting topic of discussion at the least :)

ChrisE

lgrohn
05-31-2005, 02:35 PM
My older brother did something similar... he took the DNA coding sequence for a protein in the inner ear membrane or something, and assigned each of the 4 letters a different note, and equal values, and messed around with it from there. In terms of data sources, pictures is just one way to do it. Pictures are nice though because they contain so much data in a visual medium that you can look at, and possibly try to associate the music with.There is nothing similar. When using DNA coding it it just ramdom numbers. When using pictures you get structure + more or less variation (depending on the picture). "Associate" it the right word because there is a set of parameters (tempo, instruments...).
But the code itself has no sense of what's in the picture other than colors and such. It doesn't know what the picture is showing, so it's not really "composing" a song for that scene, just for a set of data. But still, the pieces all seem to fit nicely... That also has a lot to do with the picture choice in the first place. Certain pictures just would not yield satisfactorally relevent results..Right. But parameter sets are reusable and using a certain set you can have a kind of "style" or "genre" based on those. On the second level the parameters ALSO could be taken from the picture using perhaps some AI and then, who knows...? LG

lgrohn
06-10-2005, 11:42 AM
Here will find the score of the piece generated from the picture below:
http://www.synestesia.com/scores/timeisup.pdf
and three versions of the music:
http://www.synestesia.com/cd21/usa.mp3
http://www.synestesia.com/x05/usa2005.mp3
http://www.synestesia.com/x05/timeIsUp.mp3


http://www.synestesia.com/cd21/usa.jpg