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View Full Version : EWQLSO - the future?


wayne_rowley
04-07-2005, 01:10 PM
A strange title, and this will hopefully be a strange but thought-provoking post! I have a thought in my head but I am not entirely sure how to express it, so please bear with me!

I bought EWQLSO Silver recently and I am very impressed with it. It sounds gorgeous, and of course I imagine that Gold/Platinum sound even better. With these great products along with the likes of Colossus, Choirs, RA etc, we have a palette of sounds that have never been available to musicians before now. But how long will they last?

I was put off from soft synths and samplers for many years, for one major reason. When I buy a hardware synth I know it will last as long as I want or am able to keep repairing it if it breaks down. Some synths are still going after 20 years. It could (in theory if looked after) last a composing lifetime. Software on the other hand, is useful only as long as the computers will support it. I have disks with DOS/Windows 3 programmes on that are useless and worthless, but which were invaluable 10 years ago! What will become of these great samplers and libraries in 10 years time?

The quality of these sounds exists only because of computers and their abilities. Hardware can never compete (which is why I sold my JV1080 to buy Silver ;) ). I have started with Silver, and hope one day to move to Gold Pro or even Platinum Pro when by budget and composing skills warrent it <plug>First composition with Silver now on demo forum - please listen :D </plug>

I hope that these libraries will be upgraded along with computers for my composing 'lifetime'. There is no reason why not - as long as EW/QL continue to support them.

What do others think?

Enough rambling. Have a good evening!

Wayne

Stefan Podell
04-07-2005, 01:37 PM
Well, I think you could take the same approach to computers. You certainly can still find computers and related parts that would run your DOS and Windows 3 titles. And they would run exactly as they always did, just the way a JV-1080 does.

The more mainstream, the better, in this case. I'm sure I could go dig up a generic 386 system for less than $100 and it would work perfectly. Or put another way, if I hadn't thrown away my 486DX2-66 a long time ago, I could've kept it running until this day. Just so I could play old DOS games on it! :)

Old computers don't need to be tossed when a new one is bought, but we have this funny expectation that one computer should do everything for us. Most people wouldn't toss their DX-7 when they got a D-50. They just do different things.

Food for thought...

Liam
04-07-2005, 06:12 PM
I would think the answer to that is really based on how many years EWQL supports their products and/or is in the same business. From what I can see, with them being at the forefront of all sample libs, they are not likely going anywhere anytime soon, and I'm sure 10 years from now all the major libs like Symphonic Orchestra will have many updates to keep up with the fast moving computer technology, and will not be left behind.

Liam

Nick Phoenix
04-07-2005, 07:16 PM
Yes we'll be around for a while and are exploring new ideas and technologies.

Robert H. Weston II
04-07-2005, 10:28 PM
I think they are here to stay for sure. After all, they are pioneers in what they do. As far as the technology?????

As an amatuer composer I have the luxury of setting my own pace. As a gear nut, I want every Library EWQL has ever made as well as a handful of others. This is not really practical for me in any way. I am now in the process of developing my craft, and learning to fully utilize the great libs and other gear I have before moving on. No quantity of gear or Quality of Libraries is going to make me a better composer.

If I were a professional then I would say that it would be a necessity to stay at the forefront of new technology. The other exception would be serious aspiring composers, who want to compete in a professional market, that' just the name of the game I think.

I have Silver, and have the Silver Pro upgrade on order. I was originally determined to buy Gold and upgrade to Platinum (still hopefull in the future) after I had purchased Silver. I thought that if I had the additional articulations and what-not that I could make my compositions really come alive..........then

I heard some works posted by other composers that use Silver like Bernard Asselin and Filmcompozers that just blew me away. I realized that I probably ought to spend a little more time developing myself before continuing to buy,buy,buy. As I grow, so will my pallette of NECESSARY gear.

I have Silver, Stormdrums, Colossus on the way, and the Silver Pro upgrade on order. These are amazing tools, and the sonic quality and function of these tools is going to last me a good while I think. At least until the little gear demon on my left shoulder starts chanting RA, Choirs, Platinum, Many more Computers....LOL

Take care

dcoscina
04-08-2005, 05:46 AM
I realized that I probably ought to spend a little more time developing myself before continuing to buy,buy,buy. As I grow, so will my pallette of NECESSARY gear.


I respect this philosophy a lot. I think it's very easy to get seduced by the bigger and better toys out there. But there will always be bigger and better toys.

I had to regretfully cancel my Gold Pro pre-order for financial reasons a month back. But I took comfort in the fact that I will be buy silver pro using some of my soundsonline points when it's released later this month. I started with Silver last summer and got a lot of lieage out of it. It's not to be underestimated. And I like how all of the primary articulations can be loaded in keyswitch programs.

Now, I did buy Gold at x-mas this year. And I honestly have to say it is a beautiful library. And there is a marked difference between Gold and Silver as there is undoubtedly a big difference between Gold and Platinum. But I also have to take a step backwards and see the forest through the trees. It's all about composing music, however way you do it. Doug and Nick have provided us with great sounds to realise our musical ideas. and I'll happily support their products as much as I can. But sometimes learning to compose with what you've got is a great way to grow as a composer. I know I try to remind myself about this whenever I get too feverish with gear lust.

wayne_rowley
04-08-2005, 05:52 AM
Well, I think you could take the same approach to computers. You certainly can still find computers and related parts that would run your DOS and Windows 3 titles. And they would run exactly as they always did, just the way a JV-1080 does.

Old computers don't need to be tossed when a new one is bought, but we have this funny expectation that one computer should do everything for us. Most people wouldn't toss their DX-7 when they got a D-50. They just do different things.

Food for thought...

Good point Stefan! You are right about computers not necessarily becoming obsolete. However, like all hardware they will break down. Going back to my JV1080 analogy, if it broke it could be repaired, even if an engineer had to scavenge parts from another dead unit. The same is true with a computer. The problem now is that you then have to re-install the software... which is copy protected! The rumour is that Microsoft introduced registration keys in WIndows XP, not so much as to stop piracy, but to 'force' users to upgrade to the next latest and greatest version when they deem the time right - they just stop issuing XP activations! I don't think that Native Instruments are quite so mercenary, but can you honestly see them activating the current version of Kompakt in 5 years time - let alone 10 or 15!!

Hmmm

Wayne

wayne_rowley
04-08-2005, 05:55 AM
Yes we'll be around for a while and are exploring new ideas and technologies.

That's good to hear Nick! Thanks for participating. I think the continuity of these great software samplers will only continue if EW/QL continue to support, develop and upgrade them. I am glad to hear that this will be the case!

Keep them coming! :)

Wayne

wayne_rowley
04-08-2005, 06:01 AM
I have Silver, and have the Silver Pro upgrade on order. I was originally determined to buy Gold and upgrade to Platinum (still hopefull in the future) after I had purchased Silver. I thought that if I had the additional articulations and what-not that I could make my compositions really come alive..........then

I heard some works posted by other composers that use Silver like Bernard Asselin and Filmcompozers that just blew me away. I realized that I probably ought to spend a little more time developing myself before continuing to buy,buy,buy. As I grow, so will my pallette of NECESSARY gear.

I have Silver, Stormdrums, Colossus on the way, and the Silver Pro upgrade on order. These are amazing tools, and the sonic quality and function of these tools is going to last me a good while I think. At least until the little gear demon on my left shoulder starts chanting RA, Choirs, Platinum, Many more Computers....LOL

Take care

My thoughts exactly Robert! That is why I bought Silver rather than Gold in the recent UK group buy (cost was another factor :( ). But I too heard the great things others have produced with Silver, and I thought that the day I can produce something is good - that is the time to consider moving up to Gold or Platinum - when/if my talent requires it!

In the meantime I am enjoying Silver imensely. I will definitely go for Silver Pro when it is released. I would also like RA and Stormdrum (but will have to save the pennies - or wait for a group buy). One day I may upgrade to a version of Gold, or even Platinum. After all in 5 years time the average home computer will be able to run Platinum Pro without even breaking a sweat!

Take care,
Wayne

Sean R. Beeson
04-08-2005, 06:15 AM
Sampling is becmoing more mainstream, and as the younger generation, (ages 18-30/40's), become filmcomposers and media related composers, using this software, the industry will only get larger. I faithfully think that EAST WEST is going to head it up too. Every one of their products has amazed me. I can't afford an orchestra to play my pieces, so the next best thing is to have software such as this. The only thing that could ruin our fun is performer's unions.

Beeson

Doug Rogers
04-08-2005, 08:11 AM
That's good to hear Nick! Thanks for participating. I think the continuity of these great software samplers will only continue if EW/QL continue to support, develop and upgrade them. I am glad to hear that this will be the case!

Keep them coming! :)

Wayne

Well, let's see, 2005 is our 17th year in this business. We are the largest developer and distributor of virtual instruments. We made the first commercial drum sample CD in 1988; the first sample CD by a celebrity engineer/producer in 1989 (Bob Clearmountain Drums co-produced by myself); the first MIDI (Groove) Control loop CD in 1990 (Dance/Industrial 1); a series of celebrity artist sample CDs (starting with Prince's rhythm section co-produced by myself); the first multi-velocity piano library in 1995 (Ultimate Piano); we started the first downloadable sounds site the same year (SOL); the first 6 velocity 'streaming' piano for Giga in 1997 (Steinway) which was in fact the very first sample library ever developed for Giga, followed by more libraries for that technology than any other company; we developed the NI OEM program with NI (over 100 VIs released to date - we developed and distribute over half of them); we developed the first surround sound capable symphonic orchestra and choir virtual instruments (Nick and myself); the first multi-track loop VI to auto-sync to host tempo (Adrenaline); we have received over 30 international awards for our sound design, more than any other company; IMO Nick Phoenix is brilliant and the most critically acclaimed sound designer in the business; plus other things I can't remember right now.

In a nutshell, we don't intend going anywhere but up! The software will always be updated or we will re-release the products in another format (after all, we have audio masters for all of them).

I hope that gives some sense of history and our stability as a company.

- Doug

Stefan Podell
04-08-2005, 08:40 AM
Yeah, but what have you done for us lately? :p :D :p

neoTypic
04-08-2005, 08:46 AM
Yeah, but what have you done for us lately? :p :D :p

Darn you, darn you, darn you! Now I have Janet Jackson stuck in my head!

What have you done for me lately? Oooh oooooh oooh yeah!

Stefan Podell
04-08-2005, 08:48 AM
Careful, or I'll put a Strongbad song in your head, too...

neoTypic
04-08-2005, 08:57 AM
Amazon.com clip: What Have You Done For Me Lately (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/clipserve/B000002G43001002/0/104-9116411-7213548) (scroll down)

Feel my pain. :p

AndyFinkenstadt
04-08-2005, 09:43 AM
...IMO Nick Phoenix is brilliant and the most critically acclaimed sound designer in the business; plus other things I can't remember right now.

Can I come work for you guys? :)